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Curriculum Map

 

Unit: Introduction / Grammar

Essential Question

 

Can I communicate effectively both verbally and nonverbally?

 

Guiding Questions

Resources

KCAS

Vocabulary

 

Can I use pretests to measure my growth as a student?

 

Can I write a self-reflective letter using correct friendly letter format?

 

Do I have areas for improvement in regards to my grammar pretest?

 

 

 

 

 

 

- CANVAS
- Daily grammar bell ringers

- Communication exercises

- Grammar/mechanics pretest

- Friendly letter examples

- Friendly letter rubric

S.L.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions.

 

L.9-10.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

 

L.9-10.3: Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts.

 

competency, pretest, grammar, mechanics, usage, introduction, body, conclusion, verbal, nonverbal, friendly letter, communication, noun, verb, pronoun, adverb, adjective, conjunction, interjection, preposition

 

Unit: Short Stories  

Essential Question

 

Can I analyze complex characters and plot elements?

 

Guiding Questions

Resources

KCAS

Vocabulary

Can I define and identify the elements of a short story?

 

Can I identify plot elements from a given short story?

 

Can I read and analyze a work of fiction?

 

Can I create alternate resolutions or endings?

 

Can I analyze the central characters of a short story?

 

Can I identify and analyze the theme of a short story?

 

Can I compare and contrast various themes?

 

Can I compare and contrast characters from different stories?

 

Can I identify the point of view in a short story?

 

Can I create examples of different types of point of view?

 

Can I determine the role dialect plays in a story?

 

Can I determine the role dialect plays in communication?

- CANVAS
- Daily grammar bell ringers
- Short story texts (printed and PDF) 
- Plot graphs
- PPT and graphic notes organizer
- Video representations of stories  
- Prezi
- OneDrive
- Interactive reading
- Class discussion
- Vocabulary quizzes

- Parts of Speech bingo
- Individual short story projects (examples and rubric) 
- Point of view comic strips (examples and rubric)

- Soda vs. Pop vs. Coke Debate: http://popvssoda.com/

- Harvard Dialect Survey

- Vocabulary estimator: http://testyourvocab.com/

- Dialect audio samples:

http://www.pbs.org/speak/seatosea/americanvarieties/map/map.html

RL.9 -10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

NCTE/IRA Standard 2: Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.

CCR Standard #4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple meaning words and phrases by using context clues, analyzing meaningful word parts, and consulting generalized and specialized reference materials, as appropriate.

Common Core HS.RL.6.: Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work.

RL.9 – 10.9 Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work.

L.9-10.3 Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts.

 

Setting, plot, atmosphere, tone, mood, exposition, inciting incident, internal conflict, flashback, foreshadowing,  external conflict, suspense, rising action, climax, falling action, conclusion, irony, dramatic irony, situational irony, verbal irony, theme, characterization, plot twist, protagonist, antagonist, fiction, point of view, first person, second person, third person limited, omniscient, limited, dialect, abstract, concrete

 

Unit: Fictional Novel

Essential Question

 

How can I apply themes presented in fiction to real life situations and contexts?

Guiding Questions

Resources

KCAS

Vocabulary

What historical background information can help me understand the setting of this story?

 

How does the setting impact the plot as a whole?

 

How can I demonstrate analytical reading skills?

 

Can I define and correctly use vocabulary from this novel?

 

Can I analyze motives of both the protagonist and antagonist?


Can I identify the novel’s plot elements?

 

Can I relate characters from the novel to non-fictional people?

 

How do the events depicted in this novel relate to historical issues and events in America?

 

Can I identify the theme of this novel?

 

Can I create my own resolution or narrative twist for this novel?

 

How does this novel’s events and/or characters relate to another novel or short story you have previously read?

-Huckleberry Finn
-The Secret Life of Bees
-Great Expectations
- Daily grammar bell ringers

- CANVAS

- Prezi
- OneDrive
- Interactive reading
- Class discussion

- Online discussion boards
- Vocabulary quizzes

- Guided reading questions

- Postcard symbolism activity

- Brochure project
- 12 point dodecahedron project

- RWT character analysis trading cards 
- Character analysis graphic organizers

- Plot graphs / organizers
- Parts of Speech bingo
- Independent reading projects
- Song lyric analysis

S.L.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions.

L.9-10.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.9-10.3: Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts.

RL.9-10.3: Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance in the plot or develop theme. 

RL.9 -10.1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

 

noun, verb, pronoun, adverb, adjective, conjunction, interjection, preposition, setting, plot, atmosphere, tone, mood, exposition, inciting incident, internal conflict, flashback, foreshadowing,  external conflict, suspense, rising action, climax, falling action, conclusion, irony, dramatic irony, situational irony, verbal irony, theme, characterization, plot twist, protagonist, antagonist, fiction, book specific vocabulary

 

Unit: Research and Debate

Essential Question

 How can I research and present reliable information in a succinct and relevant manner?

Guiding Questions

Resources

KCAS

Vocabulary

How do I select a research topic?

What makes a topic appropriate?

 

Can I identify the purpose and point of view of an author?

 

Can I identify a thesis statement in an introductory paragraph?

 

What makes a thesis statement effective?
 

Can I evaluate thesis statements?

 

How do I create my own thesis statement?

 

How do I conduct academic research?

 

What makes a source credible?

 

How do I outline my research paper?

 

What is MLA format?

 

What is debate protocol?

 

What is a claim and counterclaim?

 

How do I develop a counterclaim?

 

How does one “win” a debate?

 

 

 

- Agree, disagree, neutral activity

- List of topics / class brainstorm

- Research paper examples

- Paper rubric

- Essay map

- Research log

- Thesis statement PPT and lecture

- Thesis generator: http://corptrain.phoenix.edu/thesis_generator/thesis_generator.html

- CANVAS tutorials

- Outline / template

- MLA formatting workshop

- Citations: http://www.citationmachine.net/

- Peer reviews
- Editing and revising workshop

- Self-assessment using rubric

- OneDrive for submission and teacher feedback

- Debate videos

- Debate discussion boards (CANVAS)

- Debate protocol PPT

- Computers available for research

- Debate graphic organizer

- Debate rubric

HS.W.9-10.8: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources 

HS.W.9-10.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of a substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient answers.

HS.RI .9-10.6: Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

HS.RI.9-10.8: Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

HS.RI. 9-10.2: Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of a text.

CCR Speaking/Listening Standard #4 – Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

 

Agree, disagree, neutral, affirmative, opposition, thesis, argumentative, persuasive, outline, template, main idea, supporting details, references, sources, bibliography, works cited, plagiarism, reliable, credible, MLA format, claim, counterclaim

 

Unit: Poetry  

Essential Question

 

How can interpreting figurative language in poetry help me become a better reader and writer?

 

Guiding Questions

Resources

KCAS

Vocabulary

Can I define various poetic devices?

 

Can I provide examples of various poetic devices?

 

What role does imagery play in poetry?

 

What role does symbolism play in poetry?

 

Where do we use both symbolism and imagery in daily life?

 

Can I explain the theme of a given poem?

 

Can I compare and contrast the styles of two poets?

 

Can I interpret the figurative language used in various poems?

 

What role did poetry play in the lives of citizens alive in Elizabethan England?

 

Can I make a connection between Shakespeare’s writing and today’s vocabulary?

 

Can I analyze and present the work of my chosen poet in a class project?

 

 

 

 

 

 

- CANVAS
- Daily grammar bell ringers

- Poetry pretest

- Weekly vocabulary quizzes (poetic terms)
- Poems: “The Road Not Taken,” “The Raven,” “Annabel Lee,” “I’m Nobody! Who are you?” “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” “Where the Sidewalk Ends”   

- Shakespearean Sonnets

- Iambic pentameter PPT and lecture
- Iambic pentameter rhythm activities

- Horrible Histories YouTube clips

- Shakespeare or HipHop? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DSbtkLA3GrY

- Poetry stations (writing various types) 

- Poet / poetry analysis project

- Project examples

- Project rubric

RL.9-10.10: By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems.  

RL. 9-10.9: Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work.

 L.9-10.5: Interpret figures of speech.

NCTE/IRA Standard 2: Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.

HS.RI. 9-10.2: Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of a text.

CCR Speaking/Listening Standard #4 – Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

S.L.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions.

 

Literary devices, figurative language, imagery, symbolism, simile, metaphor, diction, elegy, end rhyme, epic,  free verse, hyperbole, iambic pentameter, imagery, internal rhyme, metaphor, mood, onomatopoeia, personification, quatrain, refrain, simile, symbolism, theme, tone, voice

 

Unit: The Odyssey  

Essential Question

 

What important lessons can we learn from Odysseus’ journey and decisions?

 

Guiding Questions

Resources

KCAS

Vocabulary

What are the character traits of a hero? What makes someone a hero?

 

Can I identify real locations from The Odyssey on a map?

 

Can I define and correctly use vocabulary from this epic poem?

 

How does Odysseus’ trait of hubris act as his tragic flaw?

 

Can I find tragic flaws in other literary characters?

 

Can I analyze complex character relationships like those of Odysseus and Circe; Odysseus and Athena; etc.?

 

What would you have done differently if you were Odysseus?

 

How can I work collaboratively to create a cumulative theme park project?

- CANVAS
- Daily grammar bell ringers

- Weekly vocabulary quizzes

- Mythology basics

- The Iliad

- Hero writing prompt

- Interactive reading

- Notes organizers

- Mapping activities

- Character analysis organizers

- Guided reading questions

- Symbolism post cards

- Theme park projects (examples and rubrics)

 

Common Core RL.9-10.10: By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems.  

Common Core RL. 9-10.9: Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work.

Common Core L.9-10.5s: Interpret figures of speech.

S.L.9-10.1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions.

L.9-10.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.9-10.3: Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts.

CCR Speaking/Listening Standard #4 – Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

 

Hero, hubris, epic poem, mythology, tragic flaw, character foils, The Iliad, Trojan War, yearning, muster, hospitality, monstrous, vulnerable, appoint, jostle, exploit, prowl, antidote, medias res

 

Unit: Writing  / Non-Fiction

Essential Question

 

How can I respond effectively in a variety of realistic writing situations?

 

Guiding Questions

Resources

KCAS

Vocabulary

When would I have to write a persuasive piece in my life?

 

When would I have to write an informative piece in my life?

 

Can I use a rubric to assess my own writing?

 

Why is proper grammar important?

 

What can I learn from reading a biography or autobiography?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

- CANVAS
- Daily grammar bell ringers

- SPAM: Situation, Purpose, Audience, Mode

- Writing workshop

- Writing prompts  

- Rubrics

- Self and peer assessment using rubric

- Applications / resumes

- Student selected reading: biographies or autobiographies

- Biographical research organizers

- Biography project (presentation)

- Project rubric

- Computer access for research 

 

L.9-10.2: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.9-10.3: Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts.

CCR Anchor Standards for Reading 9: Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes of topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

RL.9 -10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text

RL.9 -10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text  

HS.W.9-10.8: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources 

CCR Speaking/Listening Standard #4 – Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

 

SPAM, on demand, application, resume, cover letter, persuasive, informative, introduction, body, conclusion, main idea, supporting details, biography, autobiography

 

Unit: Drama

Essential Question

 

What can teenage readers learn from the dramatic irony created throughout Romeo and Juliet?

Guiding Questions

Resources

KCAS

Vocabulary

How do rash and impulsive decisions affect the lives of teenagers?

 

Where is Verona, Italy?

 

Can I define and correctly use vocabulary from this play?

 

What is an oxymoron? Where is this used in the play? Real life?

 

How do vendettas affect us today?

 

How does Shakespeare use the different types of irony in Romeo and Juliet?

 

How would you rewrite this play? 

 

What are the central themes of Romeo and Juliet?

 

What are the central themes of West Side Story?

 

How can I compare/contrast the works of Romeo and Juliet and West Side Story?

 

 

 

- CANVAS
- Daily grammar bell ringers

- Anticipation guide

- Romeo and Juliet

- Character list

- Interactive reading / acting

- Notes organizers

- Character analysis organizers

- Guided reading questions

- Horoscope activity

- West Side Story

- Video representations

- Drama Projects: Advice column; Editorial; Persuasive letter; Short play; soundtrack

- Project rubrics

RL.9-10.10: By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems.  

CCR Anchor Standards for Reading 9: Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes of topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

NCTE/IRA Standard 2: Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.

RL.9-10.3 Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance in the plot or develop theme. 

Common Core HS.RL.6.: Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work.

 

drama; dialogue; blank verse; dramatic irony, verbal irony, situational irony, act, scene, oxymoron, bestir, ardor, trifling, marred, blaspheme, vendetta, civil, strife, mortal, quarrel, envious, enmity, conventional, obstinate, immodest, fickle, vice, virtue, sullen, foe, hot-blooded, discord, villain, slander, scorn, triumphant, trivial, contrary, banish, brawl, star-crossed